Monday, January 29, 2007

Tikkar, Rajasthani Paratha

TIKKAR
This unleavened maize and wheat flour bread is typical of Rajasthan. As the name suggests, tikkar is a dry, chewy bread. This texture is achieved by making a stiff dough. I have used oil to cook these rotis to make them crisper, but traditionally they are cooked without using any oil. Oil or ghee is smeared over the roti just before serving.This rustic bread complements all kinds of spicy pickles.Cooking Time : 20 mins. Preparation Time : 30 mins. Makes 8 rotis.
Ingredients
1 cup maize flour (makai ka atta)
1 cup whole wheat flour (gehun ka atta)
½ teaspoon ginger paste
1/2 onion, grated
1 teaspoon garlic, grated
2 tablespoons chopped coriander
1/2 teaspoon chopped green chillies
1 teaspoon chilli powder
2 tablespoons melted ghee
salt to taste
Other ingredients
ghee or oil for cooking
Method

1. Combine the maize flour, wheat flour and salt.

2. Add in the ghee and rub with your fingertips till the mixture resembles bread crumbs.

3. Knead into a stiff dough using water.

4. Cover the dough with a wet muslin cloth and leave aside for 20 minutes.

5. Add all the remaining ingredients and knead well.

6. Divide the dough in 8 equal portions.

7. Roll out each portion into a circle of 125 mm. (5") diameter or a triangle of 6 mm. (1/4") thickness.

8. Cook each roti on a hot tava (griddle) using a little ghee or oil, till both sides are golden brown.
Serve hot.

7 comments:

Priya Dilip said...

is makai ka atta same as cornflower?

Tarla Dalal team said...

Dear Priya,

Makai ka atta is the flour made made from dry corn and is yellowish in colour. It is usually used to make rotis or parathas.

Whereas cornflour is the processed flour made from corn. It is whiter in colour and finer in texture as compared to makai ka atta because of processing. It is used extensively in Chinese cooking as a thickening agent for soups, gravies, desserts etc.

I hope I have cleared your doubts, for further assistance please feel free to write back.

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Anonymous said...

this is great! my mom loves this roti and i've always wondered how to make it... thank you!

----
www.smallhandsdesigns.com

stevacme said...

Does anyone know of a bread from rajasthan that is made by baking for most of the day wrapped in cloth buried in the sand?

Tarla Dalal said...

DAL BAATI CHURMA


Rajasthani food is incomplete without the mention of the famed Dal-Baati-Churma. What started as a picnic food has become a distinctive cuisine of the State. It consists of baatis or flaky round breads baked over firewood or over kandas (i.e. cow dung cakes) as done in villages. Baatis can be baked in a gas tandoor or an electric oven as well. Bafla or steamed baatis are also very popular.
But one thing common for baatis, irrespective of their cooking technique is that they are always served dipped in ghee accompanied with panchmel or panch kutti dal and churma.
The dal is cooked with ghee, the masalas in the dal are fried in ghee and more ghee is mixed into the dal before serving.
Often a large batch of baatis is made and part of the dough is left unsalted. This unsalted dough then shaped into rounds and deep fried in ghee. Later these deep fried baatis are crushed and sugar or jaggery is mixed into them to make a sweet dessert- churma.
The three together, simple though they sound, make a very filling meal.
No Rajasthani festive or wedding menu is complete without this popular recipe.


Cooking Time : 1hour
Preparation Time : 20 mins.

Serves 5.

For the panchmel dal

1/3 cup split Bengal gram (chana dal)
1/3 cup toovar (arhar) dal
1/3 cup green moong dal (split green gram)
1 tablespoon urad dal (split black lentils)
1 tablespoon whole moong (whole green gram)
3 teaspoons chilli powder
1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder (haldi)
1 teaspoon coriander (dhania) powder
1/2 teaspoon garam masala
3 cloves
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera)
2 green chillies, slit
a pinch asafoetida (hing)
2 teaspoons amchur (dry mango powder)
2 teaspoons tamarind (imli) pulp
3 tablespoons ghee
salt to taste

For the baatis (for 10 baatis)

1 cup whole wheat flour (gehun ka atta)
1/2 cup semolina (rawa)
2 tablespoons Bengal gram flour (besan)
8 tablespoons milk
4 tablespoons melted ghee
salt to taste

For serving

melted ghee
1 recipe churma

For the panchmel dal


1. Clean and wash the dals and add 4 cups of water. Pressure cook for 2 to 3 whistles or till the dals are cooked.


2. In a bowl, combine the chilli powder, turmeric powder, coriander powder, garam masala with 3 tablespoons of water and mix well. Keep aside.


3. Heat the ghee in a pan and add the cloves, bay leaves, cumin seeds, green chillies and asafoetida. When the cumin seeds crackle, add the prepared masala paste and saut for 1 to 2 minutes.


4. Add the cooked dals, amchur, tamarind pulp and salt and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Adjust the consistency of the dal before serving and if required, add some water.


For the baatis


1. Mix all the ingredients and knead into a firm dough. Knead well for 5 to 7 minutes.


2. Divide the dough into 10 equal portions and shape each portion into an even sized round. Flatten the rounds lightly using your thumb to make an indentation in the centre of the baati.


3. Boil water in a broad vessel and drop the baatis in the boiling water. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes over a high flame.


4. When the baatis are done, drain and keep aside.


5. Heat a gas tandoor and put the baatis on the grill of the tandoor. Cook them on a medium flame for 20 to 25 minutes. Cooking the baatis over a medium flame will ensure that the baatis are cooked on the insides also.


6. Arrange the baatis on a serving plate, break each baati into two pieces and pour melted ghee on the baatis.


How to proceed


1. Pour hot panchmel dal over the baatis.


2. Serve hot with churma.


Tips

You can cook the baatis in a gas tandoor (without boiling them).
Alternatively bake the boiled baatis in a pre-heated oven at 200°C (400°F) for 10 to 15 minutes turning them over occasionally.
Or even deep fry them in hot ghee instead of cooking them in a tandoor.

Tarla Dalal said...

Dear Stevacme,

the famous rajasthani bread is known as baati...here are recipes for you to try....let us know how did they turn..


MASALA BAATI


Baati, the famous Rajasthani bread truly unravels the magic and mystique of its cuisine. There are several innovative methods and recipes for making baatis.
This recipe of green peas stuffed whole wheat baatis in one of my personal favourites.
You can use a moong dal (mogar) stuffing instead of this one that I have chosen.
Enjoy these hot baatis immersed in ghee with the famous panchmel dal for a mouth-watering experience.


Preparation Time : 10 mins.
Cooking Time : 45 mins.

Serves 5.

For the baatis

1 cup whole wheat flour (gehun ka atta)
½ cup semolina (rawa)
4 tablespoons melted ghee
8 tablespoons milk
salt to taste

For the stuffing

1 cup green peas, boiled and crushed
½ teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera)
¼ teaspoon asafoetida (hing)
½ teaspoon ginger-green chilli paste
¼ teaspoon chilli powder
1 teaspoon coriander (dhania) powder
1½ tablespoons oil
salt to taste

For serving

melted ghee
1 recipe panchmel dal
1 recipe churma

For the baatis


1. Combine all the ingredients and knead into a firm dough using milk.


2. Knead well for 5 to 7 minutes.


3. Divide the dough into 10 equal parts. Cover with a wet muslin cloth and keep aside.


For the stuffing


1. Heat the oil in a pan, add the cumin seeds and asafoetida.


2. When the seeds crackle, add the green peas, ginger-green chilli paste, chilli powder, coriander powder and salt and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes.


3. Allow to cool completely. Divide the mixture into 10 equal parts. Keep aside.


How to proceed


1. Roll out each portion of the dough into a circle of 37 mm. (1½") diameter.


2. Place one portion of the stuffing mixture in the centre of the rolled dough circle.


3. Surround the stuffing mixture completely with the dough by slowly stretching it over the filling mixture.


4. Seal the ends tightly and remove any excess dough if necessary.


5. Flatten the rounds lightly and make a small indentation in the centre of the baati using your thumb.


6. Boil water in a large pan and drop the baatis into the boiling water. Cook for 15 minutes over a high flame. Drain and keep aside.


7. Heat a gas tandoor and place the baatis on the grill of the tandoor.


8. Cook them over a medium flame for 20 to 25 minutes so that the baatis get cooked on the insides also.


9. Arrange the baatis on a serving dish, break them into pieces and pour some melted ghee over.


10. Serve with hot panchmel dal and churma.


Tips

You can cook the baatis in a pre-heated oven at 200°C (400°F) for 10 to 15 minutes turning them over occasionally or even deep fry them in hot ghee
instead of cooking them in a tandoor.

DAL BAATI CHURMA


Rajasthani food is incomplete without the mention of the famed Dal-Baati-Churma. What started as a picnic food has become a distinctive cuisine of the State. It consists of baatis or flaky round breads baked over firewood or over kandas (i.e. cow dung cakes) as done in villages. Baatis can be baked in a gas tandoor or an electric oven as well. Bafla or steamed baatis are also very popular.
But one thing common for baatis, irrespective of their cooking technique is that they are always served dipped in ghee accompanied with panchmel or panch kutti dal and churma.
The dal is cooked with ghee, the masalas in the dal are fried in ghee and more ghee is mixed into the dal before serving.
Often a large batch of baatis is made and part of the dough is left unsalted. This unsalted dough then shaped into rounds and deep fried in ghee. Later these deep fried baatis are crushed and sugar or jaggery is mixed into them to make a sweet dessert- churma.
The three together, simple though they sound, make a very filling meal.
No Rajasthani festive or wedding menu is complete without this popular recipe.


Cooking Time : 1hour
Preparation Time : 20 mins.

Serves 5.

For the panchmel dal

1/3 cup split Bengal gram (chana dal)
1/3 cup toovar (arhar) dal
1/3 cup green moong dal (split green gram)
1 tablespoon urad dal (split black lentils)
1 tablespoon whole moong (whole green gram)
3 teaspoons chilli powder
1/4 teaspoon turmeric powder (haldi)
1 teaspoon coriander (dhania) powder
1/2 teaspoon garam masala
3 cloves
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera)
2 green chillies, slit
a pinch asafoetida (hing)
2 teaspoons amchur (dry mango powder)
2 teaspoons tamarind (imli) pulp
3 tablespoons ghee
salt to taste

For the baatis (for 10 baatis)

1 cup whole wheat flour (gehun ka atta)
1/2 cup semolina (rawa)
2 tablespoons Bengal gram flour (besan)
8 tablespoons milk
4 tablespoons melted ghee
salt to taste

For serving

melted ghee
1 recipe churma

For the panchmel dal


1. Clean and wash the dals and add 4 cups of water. Pressure cook for 2 to 3 whistles or till the dals are cooked.


2. In a bowl, combine the chilli powder, turmeric powder, coriander powder, garam masala with 3 tablespoons of water and mix well. Keep aside.


3. Heat the ghee in a pan and add the cloves, bay leaves, cumin seeds, green chillies and asafoetida. When the cumin seeds crackle, add the prepared masala paste and saut for 1 to 2 minutes.


4. Add the cooked dals, amchur, tamarind pulp and salt and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes. Adjust the consistency of the dal before serving and if required, add some water.


For the baatis


1. Mix all the ingredients and knead into a firm dough. Knead well for 5 to 7 minutes.


2. Divide the dough into 10 equal portions and shape each portion into an even sized round. Flatten the rounds lightly using your thumb to make an indentation in the centre of the baati.


3. Boil water in a broad vessel and drop the baatis in the boiling water. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes over a high flame.


4. When the baatis are done, drain and keep aside.


5. Heat a gas tandoor and put the baatis on the grill of the tandoor. Cook them on a medium flame for 20 to 25 minutes. Cooking the baatis over a medium flame will ensure that the baatis are cooked on the insides also.


6. Arrange the baatis on a serving plate, break each baati into two pieces and pour melted ghee on the baatis.


How to proceed


1. Pour hot panchmel dal over the baatis.


2. Serve hot with churma.


Tips

You can cook the baatis in a gas tandoor (without boiling them).
Alternatively bake the boiled baatis in a pre-heated oven at 200°C (400°F) for 10 to 15 minutes turning them over occasionally.
Or even deep fry them in hot ghee instead of cooking them in a tandoor.